Watching Bush’s War

I’m a huge fan of PBS’s Frontline.  So much so that it’s my top ‘Season Pass’ on Tivo so that I’m sure no other show will preempt it for recording.  Last night PBS aired part 1 of Frontline’s Bush’s War which was duly recorded and I’ve now had the chance to watch about half of the 2 1/2 hour segment.  The quality of the show surpasses even Frontline’s excellent standards and I look forward to watching the rest of it at the earliest opportunity.

If you didn’t see it or get it recorded you can view it online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/bushswar/

Fec points to a write up in Reuters about the show and excerpts a part that includes this paragraph:

In dozens of interviews and with meticulous fact-gathering, “Frontline”
makes a convincing case for two important aspects of the war. First, it
was primarily orchestrated by Vice President Dick Cheney and Defense
Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Bush was only “the decider” insofar as he
signed off on their plans, often paying no heed to Secretary of State
Colin Powell and others.

Fec also loaned me Suskind’s The One Percent Doctrine which I’m about halfway through, and when you combine that book with this show you have pretty convincing evidence that Bush, Cheney and Rumsfeld bent us over and were none too gentle with us.

3 thoughts on “Watching Bush’s War

  1. Fec

    The book was a gift. It’s only a paperback. I have most of it seared permanently in my brain. You’re also welcome to my copy of it’s predecessor, The Price of Loyalty, about Treasury Secretary Paul O’Neill. It offers great insight into how Greenspan and the Fed operate.
    I’m reading Kevin Phillips’ American Dynasty, which I believe you’ve already digested. For us, the Frontline piece held few surprises.

    Reply
  2. Jon Lowder

    Yep, I read American Dynasty a while back. Don’t remember many specifics but I seem to remember thinking it was written in a more biased fashion than The One Percent Doctrine. You’re right that Frontline doesn’t hold many surprises, but it’s kind of like watching slo-mo replays of football games. It freshens the memory and brightens the images of the spectacular, in this case the spectacularly bad. Jon

    Reply
  3. Esbee

    You do know you can watch a kablillion back episodes, plus many other cool documentaries and such, online free through the Forsyth County Public Library’s website, right?

    Reply

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