Tag Archives: 70s rock

Eugeology #17 – King Kobra’s Ready to Strike

After last week’s weirdness, this choice from Eugene was a welcome return to more standard ’80s hairband rock. Lots of guitar riffs, soaring lead vocals punctuated with backing vocals on the refrains – yep, that’s our ’80s hairband sound and we’re going to stick with it. And with a name like King Kobra, what else would you expect?

If we were using a 5 point scale I’d give these guys a solid 2.5. Didn’t love it, but it was about average. The lyrics and lead vocals were a little strained and more than a little than over the top at some points, but given the genre and the era, I don’t think you can hold that against them.

Of the ten tracks, I liked Shadow Rider and Dancing With Desire best, mainly because Mark Free’s vocals were, comparatively, more restrained and didn’t draw as much attention to themselves as on the other tracks. They also had less of the glam-band feel and fit what I’d consider a more traditional hard rock mold. Overall, the album wasn’t bad but it did have the feel of a debut, which it was.

Long story short – it wouldn’t hurt you to listen, but I wouldn’t go out of my way to get it.

Update: Just read Tim’s take and he is going to disagree with my review wholeheartedly, and I’m pretty sure Eugene will too. The trend I’m noticing is that they enjoy the hallmark features of 80s hairbands more than I do. I agree with Tim that the guitar play is strong without being over the top – I should have mentioned that in my initial review – and that Free’s got a helluva voice. I just don’t think the style is in my wheelhouse.

Links & Notes

Ready to Strike Wikipedia Page

King Kobra’s Wikipedia page

Eugene’s Take at Wheeler’s Dog

Tim’s Take at Useless Things Need Love Too

Eugeology #16 – Alice Cooper’s Special Forces

This is a review I struggled with because I just don’t know that I have the music-review chops to adequately describe what I think of this album, so let’s just make it simple: this album is weird. Why? Well, it just is. It doesn’t sound like other stuff I’ve heard from Alice Cooper, and it doesn’t really fit neatly any genre with which I’m familiar.

Just because it’s weird, though, doesn’t mean it’s bad. There are definitely some tracks I thought were kind of fun like You Want It, You Got It, You Look Good in Rags and Don’t Talk Old to Me, but I swear I couldn’t give you a single example of anything that it’s similar to in my experience. Hell, if I didn’t have the album’s Wikipedia page to reference I couldn’t even tell you the 5-year timeframe in which it was recorded. The year was 1981, by the way, and I challenge you to listen to it and say it really sounds like anything else coming out at that time.

Hate to be a broken record (insert pun groan here), but it’s just plain weird. I think I’ve decided I don’t overly like it, but I can’t really say I didn’t like it. I just don’t know what to do with it, or what to tell you about it, so give it a listen yourself and see what you think.

Links & Notes

Special Forces Wikipedia Page

Alice Cooper’s Wikipedia page

Eugene’s Take at Wheeler’s Dog

Tim’s Take at Useless Things Need Love Too

Eugeology #15 – Starz’s Attention Shoppers!

From the opening note of the first song, I felt like I was sitting in my bedroom as a middle schooler rejoicing to the tunes emanating from my newly-acquired clock (FM!) radio. What I’m about to write might make Eugene and Tim vomit, or at least scratch their heads and say “Whaaaat?”, but my first impression was that I was hearing a long-lost Styx album. That didn’t last all the way through the album, but it was an early impression.

My comparison to Styx probably has something to do with the feel of this one. It just reeks of the late ’70s rock/pop smell – airier guitar riffs than what would follow in the ’80s and a very “happy music” tempo. The notable exception is the last track, Johnny All Alone, which is a seven minute, melodic and somber tune. Of course, it’s the one I liked the most.

Have to say that if you’re not a fan of ’70s pop-rock you’re not going to like this album, but if you are then this is a great choice. I’d never heard a single track from the album (that I can remember) and I enjoyed it enough that I gave it an extra listen. And as I mentioned I think Johnny All Alone truly leaves you with a good aftertaste (afterhear?) when you’re done.

Links & Notes

Attention Shoppers! Wikipedia Page

 Starz Wikipedia page

Eugene’s Take at Wheeler’s Dog

Tim’s Take at Useless Things Need Love Too